Uninsured medical expense terms in child support orders

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in child support on Friday, March 27, 2020. When parents divorce, they have to come up with terms of how to handle the child’s expenses. Typically, this means that one parent pays for the medical expenses for the kid. One parent might be ordered to carry the child on their health insurance plan, but there are usually some medical expenses that aren’t covered by these policies. Because of this, there must be information about how uninsured medical expenses will be handled. A few of the more common uninsured medical expenses that fall

READ MORE

Tips for creating custody plans that work

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in child custody on Thursday, March 12, 2020. Whenever possible, courts in Kansas and throughout the country want parents to split custody of their children equally. In many cases, individuals assume that alternating weeks is the best way to allocate parenting time. However, children who spend too much time away from a parent could develop separation anxiety. It may also make them feel as if their parents don’t love or care about them as much as they truly do. Parents should consider whether having custody of a child for an entire week

READ MORE

How kids can adapt after a divorce

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in divorce on Thursday, February 27, 2020. When Kansas parents get a divorce, their children may struggle to cope with the fallout of that decision. In some cases, they may believe that they were the ones who caused the marriage to end. It is important that they understand that there was nothing they could do to prevent the divorce from taking place. It is also important that a child has someone to talk to when the need arises. In some cases, it can be healthy and appropriate for kids to talk with

READ MORE

The potential tax consequences of divorce

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in divorce on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. Individuals in Kansas and throughout the United States whose divorces were finalized after Dec. 31, 2018, don’t need to claim alimony payments as income. Conversely, those making the alimony payments doesn’t get a tax break for doing so. If a person doesn’t have to claim alimony as income, it may be easier to qualify for public services or generous health insurance subsidies. However, that person is not allowed to contribute alimony payments to an IRA. This may have an impact on the recipient’s ability to

READ MORE

The consequences of establishing paternity

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in paternity on Wednesday, January 29, 2020. Asserting the legal rights and obligations of an unmarried father may begin by establishing paternity. Paternity is assumed if a father is married to the child’s mother, but there are other situations in which paternity may be assumed as well. These include a father signing a voluntary acknowledgment or even establishing a close relationship with the child and getting parental rights in court. However, in some circumstances, a Kansas mother or father may want a paternity test. A DNA test proves paternity with 99% accuracy.

READ MORE

Why some parents ask for virtual visitation

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in child custody on Thursday, January 16, 2020. When Kansas parents of young children are going through a divorce, they might want to include a schedule for virtual visitation in their plan. Virtual visitation can include email, phone calls, video calls, exchanging messages on social media and more. In general, it is any contact between parent and child that is mediated by technology. Virtual visitation is common in cases where a parent is moving out of the area where the child lives, and some critics of it say that it can make

READ MORE

Getting a right of first refusal provision in a custody agreement

On behalf of Stange Law Firm, PC posted in child custody on Thursday, January 2, 2020. Parents in Kansas who are going through a divorce may be concerned about how much time they will get to spend with their children. A noncustodial parent may want to introduce what is called a “right of first refusal” provision into the child custody agreement. This means that if one parent cannot care for the child and would need to have a sitter or another family member do so, that parent must first give that chance to the other parent. Parents may set up

READ MORE